Rubric for Effective Infographics

In class we reviewed a long list of characteristics of effective infographics, which were summarized in the blog entries in Part I of that activity.  From those summaries four main categories were identified: Usefullness, Legibility, Design and Aesthetics.  Students worked in groups to define the qualities or attributes of these categories.  The results for the two classes appear as comments to this post.


3 Responses to "Rubric for Effective Infographics"

  • From the 9 am class:

    Usefulness
    A useful infographic should have a well defined purpose. It should be universally relevant so that it applies to the largest audience possible; however, relevance depend on the topic so some infographics may be made for a specific audience. An infographic should have data that is interesting, yet relevant and from a reputable source, and should avoid distortion of that data at all costs.

    Legibility
    Legibility is an important quality in making an effective infographic. With the correct labels and axes, the data will make sense and provide accurate information. Also with appropriate font and contrast, it allows the reader to see the infographic clearly. Legibility is distinctness that makes perception easy; without legibility the infographic would be difficult to read and the data would be harder to understand.

    Design
    An effective infographic must incorporate elements of good design. Space needs to be utilized effectively, avoiding excessive clutter while still clearly conveying the message. Colors must be appealing and attractive, but not too distracting. Using too many colors that appear too similar will not enhance the graph’s design. Being creative in your graph style may attract the audience, but if not employed carefully, it can just as easily drive them away. Design should be attractive without being obtrusive and simple without being boring.

    Aesthetics
    An infographic with successful aesthetics is appealing and satisfying to the viewer’s eye, captures his or her attention immediately and has qualities of beauty and interestingness. The organization of the infographic facilitates understanding and flows naturally.

    1 dhydorn said this (November 16, 2011 at 7:33 pm)


  • From the 8 am class:

    Usefulness
    A useful infographic should have a clear purpose present, the data should come from a reliable source, the display of data should be proportional to the values (i.e., it should avoid data distortion), and the graphic should relate to the audience (i.e, it should meet the needs of the intended audience).

    Legibility
    A legible graphic should have a general aspect in the areas such as labels, axes, font, and contrast. Font would vary in size depending on the importance of the content and be an appropriate type. Axes and labels generally go together so use them when needed; include a scale when appropriate. Contrast should help with the clarity. So these bring a basis for what makes a legible graph.

    Design
    An effective infographic must use most of the available space, utilize color where needed, and present the information in the graph in a useful (containing a purpose), legible (conveys the data clearly) and aesthetically pleasing and interesting way. The choice of graphic needs to be appropriate for the data.

    Aesthetics
    In order to make an infographic aesthetically appealing you need to first make sure all of the data is organized. That is, avoid clutter or information overload. The organization of the infographic should have clear purpose to the viewer, avoiding confusion. Once the infographic is organized, it directly correlates with the overall attractiveness. If it’s easy to understand, it is easy on the eyes; in other words the infographic is attractive. Once the organization and attractiveness are achieved, the interestingness comes naturally. Add colors or small images to ultimately make an infographic aesthetically pleasing.

    2 dhydorn said this (November 16, 2011 at 7:32 pm)


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